CALIFORNIA — In what has become the norm, unfortunately, California State Parks is facing another busy wildfire season this summer. Working closely with Cal OES, CAL FIRE and other public safety agencies, the department continues to actively monitor and evaluate fire conditions and park closures when needed. State Parks’ Department Operations Center (DOC) has been activated and is conducting calls to keep districts statewide informed of the wildfires’ impacts and provide resources to impacted parks. 

Park Impacts

As of Friday, Aug. 27, State Parks has a total of seven park units fully closed and three partially closed from the current wildfires. The biggest concern right now is the Caldor Fire burning in El Dorado County, which is creating significant impacts and threatening the Lake Tahoe Basin. As of Friday evening, the Caldor Fire, which began Aug. 14 near Grizzly Flats, has burned more than 143,000 acres and is 12 percent contained. The fire has forced many local communities to evacuate and shut down Highway 50 from Sly Park Road in Pollock Pines to Myers, near the Highway 89 junction.

Here is the latest on parks impacted: 

Getting through this together, Paso Robles

The latest information on park closures can be found at parks.ca.gov/incidents.

Wildfire Safety Tips

Newly launched this week is our webpage on wildfire safety tips. You can find tips while hiking on trails or in the backcountry and links to useful information, and also learn what to do if trapped in a wildfire while on foot. Visit the State Parks webpage at parks.ca.gov/

WildfireSafetyTips.

Wildfire Numbers

As of Friday, Aug. 27, CAL FIRE says there are more than 15,000 personnel battling 14 active large wildfires that have burned a total of more than 1.6 million acres. For the latest on the wildfire incidents, please visit CAL FIRE’s webpage: fire.ca.gov/incidents/.

Air Quality

If you live or work anywhere near one of the wildfires burning, you already know the air quality remains unhealthy and in some areas, hazardous. If possible, keep outdoor activities short and consider moving physical activities indoors or rescheduling them. To check the Air Quality Index (AQI) in your area, visit airnow.gov.